It’s fair time once again

4-H, Edgar County Fairs provide educational, entertainment opportunities

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The Edgar County 4-H Fair and the Edgar County Fair open their annual runs in the next week — and we couldn’t be more excited.

Both fairs showcase our county’s largest industry — agriculture. While we may live in an age when many think 4-H and county fairs are outdated, the truth is these fairs are important to our economy, society and the heritage of our small rural county.

In the next few days, Edgar Coun¬ty 4-H’ers will be proudly displaying their projects — from cookies to goats to model rockets to artwork to photography to pets and livestock. There’s nothing like watching the hard work of a young 4-H’er pay off with a blue ribbon and the smile that accompanies it.

Don’t forget the tasty food at the annual 4-H Cafe, operated by the Edgar County 4-H Association and Edgar County Home and Community Education. Breakfast by the foundation includes biscuits and gravy and pancakes and sausage. Proceeds benefit the improvements and maintenance of the 4-H grounds. Lunch and dinner by the HCE women, include the famous barbecue, pork burgers and homemade pies and desserts. Proceeds support educational programs for area women.

The Edgar County Fair added a day this year and will get underway Saturday, July 20, with something new — big time entertainment and adult beverages. Also new this year is an exciting rodeo for the entire family, the county queen contests, the annual Barnyard Scramble, Motorcross races, the return of the fair’s talent show and the ever popular Route 1 Rumble demolition derby.

And don’t forget the Art Hall at the fair, which showcases everything from canned foods and baked goods to the opportunity to show off plants, photography, quilting, collections or other handiwork. The good news, it’s not too late to enter. Just go to the fair’s website at www.edgarcountyfair.com or stop by the fair office this week. They will be happy to help with registration.

So let’s all support the fairs and our communities this week — even if it’s just a stop for taffy or a corn dog. It’s a summertime tradition.