Ruth Poynter

Posted 5/21/21

Ruth Poynter, 81, of Paris, passed away at 8:45 a.m. Wednesday, May 19, 2021, at Life’s Journey Senior Living Center.

A funeral service is 2 p.m. Monday, May 24, at Stewart and Carroll …

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Ruth Poynter

Posted

Ruth Poynter, 81, of Paris, passed away at 8:45 a.m. Wednesday, May 19, 2021, at Life’s Journey Senior Living Center.

A funeral service is 2 p.m. Monday, May 24, at Stewart and Carroll Funeral Home. Burial is in Edgar Cemetery. Visitation is from noon until the service time Monday at the funeral home. In keeping with State of Illinois mandates due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, everyone attending the service must wear a mask while inside the funeral home. Everyone is welcome but all are asked to keep visits short so that all who wish to pay their respects may do so.

Mrs. Poynter was born Feb. 16, 1940, in Paris, the daughter of the late John Jay and Mary Smith Dorothy. She and her twin sister Rose were the fifth and sixth born of seven children. She married James L. Poynter, and they had a loving marriage for 63 years. He survives the loss of his lifetime partner.

She is also survived by her children, Linda Poynter of Champaign, James (Mary Grace) Poynter of Paris and Mary Ann Poynter of Champaign; her grandchildren, C.J. (Amber) Wright of Tampa, Fla., R.J. Zufall of Champaign and Alliyah Poynter of Paris; her great-grandson, Kolby James Wright; and her siblings, Lloyd Dorothy and Naomi Leeman.

She was preceded in death by her siblings, twin sister Rose Johnson, John Jay Dorothy Jr., Frannie Willoughby and Mickie Simmons.

Together, she and her husband always put family first. She stayed home with the children and tended to their school activities and PTA. She often baked cookies and brought them to school to celebrate birthdays.

Mrs. Poynter’s creativity contributed to the children winning first place Halloween costumes. She worked side-by-side with her husband in his various projects. Many in Paris will remember the pies she baked every Saturday for the Poynter’s Auction House.

The family was blessed to travel every year in a truck and camper across the country, and Mrs. Poynter packed the camper to the maximum weight allowed to make sure all had everything needed.

After Mr. Poynter retired from the railroad, the couple began ballroom and country dancing across the surrounding towns. They continued to travel in their later years and enjoyed the flea market hunt for the antique item that was underpriced.

Her most cherished memories were those when all of her extended family