Security is key for Paris High School

Daniel Briseno daniel@prairiepress.net
Posted 9/19/22

The Paris High School Board of Education is taking safety to the next level with a Raptor Management System enabling the school to screen visitors for potential threats.

“A visitor will have …

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Security is key for Paris High School

Posted

The Paris High School Board of Education is taking safety to the next level with a Raptor Management System enabling the school to screen visitors for potential threats.

“A visitor will have their ID scanned,” said Jeremy Larson, Superintendent of Schools for Paris 95. “If the system says OK, then they will print out an ID badge for the person to wear during the remainder of their visit.”

Safety was not the only thing on the agenda Monday night. Mark Sullivan, district 95 maintenance, spoke of the many changes made to the high school.

“We removed two quiet rooms and added walls to make a room for the nurse practitioner,” said Sullivan.

The Paris 95 Health Center is funded by an Illinois Department of Public Health Grant to provide healthcare to all students in the district. 

Sports teams will soon see changes to their venues, too. The Paris High School is one the first schools in the area to implement shot clocks for basketball games.

“They will be placed above the score boards,” said Danette Young, Superintendent of the Crestwood School District. “We just have to let the IHSA know when we use them.”

Shot clocks are 35-second clocks that keep track of the time a team has to shoot the ball. They were introduced to Illinois high school basketball this year.   

Other items being added to the sports complex is a bullpen for the softball field, air conditioning and heating to the press box and two 24 by 48 pavilions, one near the football field and one between the baseball and softball fields.

Sullivan also voiced concern about how the access road to the east of the school is crumbling.

“Water is coming off the field and getting under the road,” said Sullivan “The water is disturbing the ground underneath causing the road to sink and crumble.”

Sullivan stated the water can be seen coming up through the middle of the road where the blacktop meets, causing concern of the road’s further deterioration.

“It has lasted eight years,” said Sullivan. “We may get two more.”

Larson added when the time arises to redo the road an engineer may be needed to correct the water issue.

“We do not like to call in an engineer, normally, because the price increases exponentially,” said Larson. “However, this project may require us to do so.”